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CAA Conference: Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (Tübingen, 19-23 March 2018)

The 2018 Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA)  conference will take place between 19-23 March, at the University of Tübingen, Germany.

The Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA) Annual Conference is one of the major events in the calendar for scholars, specialists and experts in the field of computing technologies applied to archaeology.

The 46th Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology Conference (CAA 2018) has been given the theme “Human history and digital future”. The conference will address a multitude of topics. Through diverse case studies from all over the world, the conference will show new technical approaches and best practice from various archaeological and computer-science disciplines. The conference will bring together hundreds of participants from around the world in parallel sessions, workshops, tutorials and roundtables.

For general information about the conference: caa2018@caaconference.org

CAA - Computer Applications and Quantitive Methods in Archaeology

Conference: Cultural Heritage and New Technologies (Vienna, 8-10 Nov 2017)

Combining Archaeology, History, and New Technologies

The conference aims to enhance the collaboration between historians and archaeologists and related disciplines using new technologies and to showcase best practice applications in multidisciplinary research.

Museen der Stadt Wien – Stadtarchäologie

When: 8-10 November 2017

Where: the Museen der Stadt Wien – Stadtarchäologie, in Vienna, Austria.

Topics cover

  • Application of effective 3D-methods for the reconstruction of buildings, integrating archaeological excavation data with historical sources including images, thus increasing our understanding of the past
  • Additional digital methods for the combined visualisation of archaeological and historical data (e.g. monitoring changes and preservation of archaeological monuments based on historical images).
  • Application of new technologies to assess the archaeological record based on historical data (maps, tax returns, inventories, ship wreck lists, etc.) and/or combining historical sources and archaeological data in a geographical information system for recording the history of urban or rural landscapes.
  • Games, apps, and teaching software integrating archaeological and historical knowledge
  • Historical data as a basis for checking or validating digital tools applied in archaeology and vice versa.
  • Dealing with inscriptions (including cuneiform, hieroglyphs and symbols): digital methods for enhancing readability (e.g. Reflectance Transformation Imaging), pattern recognition of letters or pictograms, comparison of hand writing (same author?).
  • Statistical analysis investigating the correlation between historical place names and archaeological evidence.

Click here for Programme Overview

 

Workshop: Creating Data Management Plans (Birmingham, 29 Nov 2017)

The Chartered Institute for Archaeologists’ (CIfA) Information Management Special Interest Group (IMSIG) will be hosting a workshop on creating data management plans on Wednesday 29 November.

Location: Comfort Inn, Station Street, Birmingham B5 4DY  (a 6-minute walk from Birmingham New Street train station)

Lunch, tea and coffee will be provided. Registration will open at 10:30 with the event running from 11-3 with a break in the middle for the AGM over lunch. To book your place click here

Data Management – a Life Cycle Approach

The workshop will be built around a series of interactive exercises where participants will investigate a set of data to find the clues they need to populate a data management plan and develop metadata. Participants will re-name the data by applying our file-naming convention and save the data into our MORPHE based folder structure. As the clues come together and the limits of what can be done are reached we hope the exercise will help participants understand the consequences of leaving data management and archiving to the end of projects and why it is essential to adopt a life cycle approach. This workshop will use the ADAPt (Archaeological Digital Archiving Protocol) developed by Claire Tsang and Hugh Corley to support the Excavation & Analysis Teams at Historic England as presented at last year’s CIfA Conference https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVG4L8pAxQk.

Digital Cultural Heritage 2017 (Berlin, 30 Aug- 1 Sep 2017)

The DCH2017 Interdisciplinary Conference on Digital Cultural Heritage takes place at Berlin, Staatsbibliothek Berlin, August 30- September 01, 2017.

The full programme is available HERE

More information and registration here: http://DCH2017.net

Conference topics will cover technical challenges as well as strategic guidance.

Conference aims:

  • raise awareness in Society, Science, and Technology fields about importance of the cultural dimensions and the growing potential of Digital Cultural Heritage;
  • promote innovative content analysis from cross-organizational interoperability of digital humanities databases and XML methods, techniques, and approaches;
  • indicate on the central role of spatial concepts enabling synergy for knowledge generation from massive granular digital cultural heritage content;
  • create innovative cross-disciplines / cross sectors partnerships facilitate intercultural and interdisciplinary dialogue;
  • elaborate roles and interest of information society.

The conference is organised by CODATA Germany

PREFORMA International Conference (Tallinn, 11-12 Oct 2017)

PREFORMA International Conference – Shaping our future memory standards

National Library of Estonia, Tallinn on 11-12 October 2017.

Aim of the event is to highlight the importance of standardisation and file format validation for the long term preservation of digital cultural content, present the open source conformance checkers developed in PREFORMA and look at future challenges and opportunities.

Hosted by the National Library of Estonia, the conference will include: keynote speeches by international experts in digital preservation; live demonstrations of the software; examples and good practices of memory institutions that are integrating the PREFORMA tools in their environments; and panel discussions to reflect on how to sustain and further develop the results of the project.

The event is intended for anyone dealing with digital preservation of images, documents and audiovisual files. This conference is a great opportunity to ask and exchange with international experts, fellow archivists and even Open Source developers about file format questions, issues and challenges we are facing today.

Click here for more information about the eventRegister here before 30 September 2017

Event website: http://finalconference.preforma-project.eu/

Further information: The event will be held in English. Participation in the event is free of charge. If you have any questions or need additional information, please contact Claudio Prandoni at prandoni@aedeka.com.

Archaeological Standards and Guidance – online discussion (10–11 May 2017)

Archaeological Standards and Guidance – What are they for and who sets them?

The Chartered Institute for Archaeologists (CIfA) held an online discussion on this topic on 10-11 May 2017. Key questions covered:

  1. A new vision for 2017 and beyond? Is the Southport vision is still relevant? Can we construct a new vision for 2017 and beyond? What outcomes do we want to achieve and what should standards therefore contain?
  2. Roles and responsibilities – who sets standards? Many organisations are involved in producing standards and guidance; do we yet have a common understanding about roles and responsibilities or are we all competing with each other? Who should lead on what?
  3. New thinking on methodology and standards – how do we capitalise on the lessons of synthesis projects, and translate them into professional practice?
  4. How much should we be prescribing methods as opposed to seeking outcomes?
  5. Should improving standards make our work more cost-effective or will they add cost?

For more information about this discussion and links to current initiatives within data standards compilation, see: http://www.archaeologists.net/archaeological-standards-and-guidance-what-are-they-and-who-sets-them-online-discussion-10%E2%80%9311-may 

    

 

NEW: A Standard for Pottery Studies in Archaeology (2016)

Published in June 2016, this guidance document was compiled by the three period-specific pottery study groups (PCRG, SGRP, MPRG) with the aim of creating the first, comprehensive, inclusive standard for working with pottery. The Standard is intended for use in all types of archaeological project, including those run by community groups, professional contractors and research institutions.

Link: http://romanpotterystudy.org/new/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Standard_for_Pottery_Studies_in_Archaeology.pdf   

This standard has been published by the Medieval Pottery Research Group on behalf of the Prehistoric Ceramics Research Group, the Study Group for Roman Pottery and the Medieval Pottery Research Group.

The text was written by Alistair Barclay and David Knight (PCRG); Paul Booth and Jane Evans (SGRP); Duncan H. Brown and Imogen Wood (MPRG).

Development and production of this standard was funded by grant-aid from Historic England.

 

NEW: The National Standard & Guidance to Best Practice for Collecting & Depositing Archaeological Archives in Wales (2017)

The National Standard and Guidance to Best Practice for Collecting and Depositing Archaeological Archives in Wales comprises a suite of documents which aim to make archaeological data, information and knowledge available, stable, consistent and accessible for present and future generations. The Standard for Archaeological Archiving in Wales consists of a set of high-level principles. It represents the standard for archaeological archiving that must be met by an archaeologist or organisation undertaking any form of archaeological work that results in an archive.

Guidance documents are available as a ‘zip’ file here.

This document has been prepared by the National Panel for Archaeological Archives in Wales and is drawn from A Standard and Guide to Best Practice for Archaeological Archiving in Europe.

The National Panel has tailored this document to meet the specific needs of Wales and to offer guidance that supports the Historic Environment (Wales) Act 2016. The National Panel for Archaeological Archives in Wales is an advisory body established by the Historic Environment Group with a remit to promote the care of and encourage access to the archaeological archives of Wales.

     

IC3K 2017 (Madeira, 1-3 Nov 2017)

9th International Joint Conference on Knowledge Discovery, Knowledge Engineering and Knowledge Management

Funchal, Madeira – Portugal (1-3 November, 2017)

The conference hosts three separate mini-conferences. The purpose of the IC3K is to bring together researchers, engineers and practitioners on the areas of Knowledge Discovery, Knowledge Engineering and Knowledge Management. IC3K is composed of three co-located conferences, each specialized in at least one of the aforementioned main knowledge areas.

   9th International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Information Retrieval

Program Chair   Ana Fred, Instituto de Telecomunicações / IST, Portugal

   9th International Conference on Knowledge Engineering and Ontology Development

Program Co-chairs   David Aveiro, University of Madeira / Madeira-ITI, Portugal;
Jan Dietz, Delft University of Technology, Netherlands

   9th International Conference on Knowledge Management and Information Sharing

Program Co-chairs   Kecheng Liu, University of Reading, United Kingdom;
Jorge Bernardino, Polytechnic Institute of Coimbra – ISEC, Portugal;
Ana Carolina Salgado, Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil.

For more information about this conference, go to: http://www.ic3k.org
What is KEOD?
 Knowledge Engineering (KE) refers to all technical, scientific and social aspects involved in building, maintaining and using knowledge-based systems. KE is a multidisciplinary field, bringing in concepts and methods from several computer science domains such as artificial intelligence, databases, expert systems, decision support systems and geographic information systems.
Ontology Development (OD) aims at building reusable semantic structures that can be informal vocabularies, catalogs, glossaries as well as more complex finite formal structures representing the entities within a domain and the relationships between those entities. Ontologies, have been gaining interest and acceptance in computational audiences: formal ontologies are a form of software, thus software development methodologies can be adapted to serve ontology development. A wide range of applications is emerging, especially given the current web emphasis, including library science, ontology-enhanced search, e-commerce and business process design.