Conference: EAC symposium 2019 (Dublin, 28 Feb – 2 Mar 2019)

The mission of the Europae Archaeologiae Consilium (EAC) is to support the management of the archaeological heritage in Europe.

The topic of the 20th Heritage Management Symposium will be ‘Archaeological sites and monuments in the care of the state – sharing our experiences’.

The 20th Annual Meeting of the EAC will be held in Dublin Castle on 28 February – 2 March 2019. The event will be hosted and organised by the National Monuments Service (Ireland).

Online registration is open until 6 January 2019.

To register click here: https://www.europae-archaeologiae-consilium.org/annual-meeting-2019

Historic England: New advice and guidance documents issued (Dec 2018)

Historic England have issued a whole raft of new and updated advice and guidance documents on their website. Click here to go to the Latest Advice and Guidance page which now also includes an A to Z list of advice pdfs and a list of recently archived advice.

Examples of guidance documents include five reissued archaeological science guidance documents and some short instructional video clips. 

Publication: Historic England Updates Lidar Guidance (July 2018)

Historic England has updated its guidance publication on ‘Using Airborne Lidar in Archaeological Survey’. You can download it for free from the Historic England website:

https://historicengland.org.uk/images-books/publications/using-airborne-lidar-in-archaeological-survey/

Front cover for Using airborne lidar in archaeological survey

The basic aims of the guidance remain the same: that is to help archaeologists, researchers and those who manage the historic environment to decide first, whether using lidar data will actually be beneficial in terms of their research aims, and second, how the data can be used effectively.

The update reflects advances in the technique since the guidance was initially published in 2010, including increasing access to the relevant data and the wide range of visualisation techniques now available. The case studies illustrating the use of Lidar have also been refreshed, now with some examples from outside of Historic England.Image result for historic england logo

Publication: Historic England – Latest Advice and Guidance Catalogue (April 2017)

Historic England recently published (April 2018) a catalogue of their latest advice and guidance material covering a range of subjects areas. Examples include:

Front cover for Advice and Guidance

Caring for Heritage

  • Heritage crime
  • Post-war public art

Planning

  • Environmental assessment
  • Local listing
  • Historic area assessments

Technical – Archaeological Science

  • Land contamination
  • Organic residue
  • Preserving archaeological remains

Technical – Recording Heritage

  • Creating interpretive drawings
  • A guide to good recording practice

https://historicengland.org.uk/images-books/publications/advice-guidance-new-backlist/

Image result for historic england logo

Conference: Spatial Humanities 2018 (Lancaster, 20-21 Sept 2018)

Spatial Humanities 2018 – Call for Papers

Lancaster’s Digital Humanities Hub is hosting a Spatial Humanities 2018 conference in September 2018. The conference will explore what geospatial technologies such as Geographical Information Systems (GIS) have to contribute to humanities research.

The main aim is to explore and demonstrate the contributions to knowledge enabled by these technologies, approaches and methods within and beyond the digital humanities.  Submissions on all aspects of using geospatial technologies in humanities research, including database development, methodological innovation and applied research that develops our understanding of the geographies of the past, is welcomed.

Contributions are invited from all humanities disciplines, including (but not limited to) history (including fields from social science history such as historical demography and environmental history), archaeology, literary studies, classics, linguistics and religious studies, as well as from technical fields including GISc, digital humanities, computational linguistics and computer science.

Keynote speakers

  • Prof. David Bodenhamer, The Polis Center, Indiana Purdue University, Indianapolis
  • Dr. Janelle Jenstad, Department of English, University of Victoria.

Cost: Full registration (including teas & coffees and lunch on both days) will cost £195.

LANCASTER UNIVERSITY DIGITAL HUMANITIES HUB

CIDOC Conference 2018 – Call for Papers

Call for Papers for the next ICOM-CIDOC Conference entitled The Provenance of Knowledge.

Where and when: Heraklion, Crete, 29 September 4 October 2018.

Deadline for conference proposals (presentations, workshops and case studies): 28 February. For more information, click here: http://www.cidoc2018.com/call-papers

Conference theme

‘As an essential aspect of documentation, Provenance of Knowledge refers to the attempt to trace the origins of the information and knowledge about an object, an entity or an idea in order to reconstruct the whole chain of creation, use, interpretation and dissemination of relevant information and knowledge.

The ultimate purpose of this reconstruction is to confirm, illustrate, and validate the information and knowledge contained in the documentation in order to facilitate understanding across times and cultures. In this way, it contributes to scholarly citation in information handling while connecting all the material evidence kept in museums and other memory institutions.

The validation of information and knowledge has been greatly helped by the increasing use of digital technologies in documentation. However, this advancement in documentation has created new difficulties as the abundance of the available information makes it difficult to introduce standards and processes to model and maintain the development and validity of documented information.

The 2018 CIDOC conference aims at supporting museums by deepening the understanding of documentation as a means of knowledge preservation, dissemination and exchange.’

CAA Conference: Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (Tübingen, 19-23 March 2018)

The 2018 Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA)  conference will take place between 19-23 March, at the University of Tübingen, Germany.

The Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA) Annual Conference is one of the major events in the calendar for scholars, specialists and experts in the field of computing technologies applied to archaeology.

The 46th Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology Conference (CAA 2018) has been given the theme “Human history and digital future”. The conference will address a multitude of topics. Through diverse case studies from all over the world, the conference will show new technical approaches and best practice from various archaeological and computer-science disciplines. The conference will bring together hundreds of participants from around the world in parallel sessions, workshops, tutorials and roundtables.

For general information about the conference: caa2018@caaconference.org

CAA - Computer Applications and Quantitive Methods in Archaeology

Conference: Cultural Heritage and New Technologies (Vienna, 8-10 Nov 2017)

Combining Archaeology, History, and New Technologies

The conference aims to enhance the collaboration between historians and archaeologists and related disciplines using new technologies and to showcase best practice applications in multidisciplinary research.

Museen der Stadt Wien – Stadtarchäologie

When: 8-10 November 2017

Where: the Museen der Stadt Wien – Stadtarchäologie, in Vienna, Austria.

Topics cover

  • Application of effective 3D-methods for the reconstruction of buildings, integrating archaeological excavation data with historical sources including images, thus increasing our understanding of the past
  • Additional digital methods for the combined visualisation of archaeological and historical data (e.g. monitoring changes and preservation of archaeological monuments based on historical images).
  • Application of new technologies to assess the archaeological record based on historical data (maps, tax returns, inventories, ship wreck lists, etc.) and/or combining historical sources and archaeological data in a geographical information system for recording the history of urban or rural landscapes.
  • Games, apps, and teaching software integrating archaeological and historical knowledge
  • Historical data as a basis for checking or validating digital tools applied in archaeology and vice versa.
  • Dealing with inscriptions (including cuneiform, hieroglyphs and symbols): digital methods for enhancing readability (e.g. Reflectance Transformation Imaging), pattern recognition of letters or pictograms, comparison of hand writing (same author?).
  • Statistical analysis investigating the correlation between historical place names and archaeological evidence.

Click here for Programme Overview

 

Workshop: Creating Data Management Plans (Birmingham, 29 Nov 2017)

The Chartered Institute for Archaeologists’ (CIfA) Information Management Special Interest Group (IMSIG) will be hosting a workshop on creating data management plans on Wednesday 29 November.

Location: Comfort Inn, Station Street, Birmingham B5 4DY  (a 6-minute walk from Birmingham New Street train station)

Lunch, tea and coffee will be provided. Registration will open at 10:30 with the event running from 11-3 with a break in the middle for the AGM over lunch. To book your place click here

Data Management – a Life Cycle Approach

The workshop will be built around a series of interactive exercises where participants will investigate a set of data to find the clues they need to populate a data management plan and develop metadata. Participants will re-name the data by applying our file-naming convention and save the data into our MORPHE based folder structure. As the clues come together and the limits of what can be done are reached we hope the exercise will help participants understand the consequences of leaving data management and archiving to the end of projects and why it is essential to adopt a life cycle approach. This workshop will use the ADAPt (Archaeological Digital Archiving Protocol) developed by Claire Tsang and Hugh Corley to support the Excavation & Analysis Teams at Historic England as presented at last year’s CIfA Conference https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVG4L8pAxQk.